Options in History of Science, Short Course

About

Please note, that the content, schedule, delivery format, availability and costs of Summer School Courses in History of Science may be subject to change.

For the most up to date information, please visit the Harvard Summer School’s course options website.

For instance, you can take the following courses:
Self and Society: A Cultural History of Psychology

How has the study of psychology shaped our conception of ourselves over the past 200 years? This course examines the various selves of psychology and their refractions in popular, literary, and visual domains in the modern period. Topics include self-reflection in the early modern period; phrenology in popular nineteenth-century science; the rise of experimental psychology and the fascination with psychical research; photography and emotional expression in evolutionary psychology; work and advertising psychology; hysteria and the unconscious; personality and intelligence testing; the psychology of art; cognitive and computational models of mind; and recent developments in positive psychology.

Making Modern Medicine in America: A History, from 1800 to the Present

Greater Boston has some of the best medical facilities in the country. Modern medicine in this city involves the latest technological innovations, a variety of well-trained medical professionals, and a clearly defined understanding of the human body. How did medicine get to be this way? In this seminar, we examine the construction of the American medical system through the twentieth century. Why do medical residents do rounds? Why are hospitals often built near universities? Should we be worried about global epidemics, like SARS and Ebola? Where does direct-to-consumer marketing come from? We consider how doctors, patients, researchers, pharmaceutical reps, and the media shape our complex understanding of health, disease, and treatment.

Art and Science from the Fifteenth to the Twentieth Centuries

This is a wide-ranging course that explores 500 years of the intersections of the history of science and visual culture. Throughout the course we investigate the permeable boundaries between art and science, which have been characterized as polar opposites far too often. Science is stereotyped as an objective and rational pursuit of natural truths, while art is often considered to be a subjective and emotional pursuit of human creativity. We challenge these misguided labels. We also ask the following questions: How does science use art as evidence, an educational tool, or advertisement? Does art ever use science to the same ends? What methodological approaches do artists and scientists have in common? What is the best way to explore these interdisciplinary relationships? This course is intended for students from all disciplines, providing an introduction to the interdisciplinary and growing field of science and technology studies, which explores the role that science and technology play in our society. This introductory course explores these questions while developing students' toolsets as college-level writers and critical thinkers. Throughout the course students engage with and write about examples drawn from the histories of art and science, develop writing and critical thinking skills for an academic environment, and get a taste of the history of science and technology from a visual perspective.

Registration opens March 1, 2017 for the following three summer sessions:
  • Seven-week session: June 17–August 5, 2017
  • Three-week session I: June 17–July 7, 2017
  • Three-week session II: July 9–July 28, 2017

Detailed Programme Facts

Programme Structure

Please note, that the content, schedule, delivery format, availability and costs of Summer School Courses in History of Science may be subject to change.

For the most up to date information, please visit the Harvard Summer School’s program website.

For instance, you can take the following courses:
  • Self and Society: A Cultural History of Psychology
  • Making Modern Medicine in America: A History, from 1800 to the Present
  • Art and Science from the Fifteenth to the Twentieth Centuries.

English Language Requirements

You only need to take one of these language tests:

  • Minimum required score: 7

    The IELTS – or the International English Language Test System – tests your English-language abilities (writing, listening, speaking, and reading) on a scale of 1.00–9.00. The minimum IELTS score requirement refers to which Overall Band Score you received, which is your combined average score. Read more about IELTS.

    Take IELTS test
  • Minimum required score: 600

    The TOEFL – or Test OF English as a Foreign Language – offers a paper-based test (PBT). The final, overall PBT score ranges between 310 and 677, and is based on an average taken from the three test components (listening, structure, and reading). The writing part of this test is scored separately on a scale of 0-6. Read more about TOEFL (PBT).

  • Minimum required score: 100

    The TOEFL – or Test Of English as a Foreign Language – offers an internet-based test (iBT). The final, overall iBT score ranges between 0 and 120, and includes a scaled average from the four components (reading, listening, speaking, and writing). Read more about TOEFL (iBT).

Academic Requirements

Study abroad program directors look for mature, academically motivated students who are willing to broaden their horizons, experience a challenge, and grow as a person.

Who can apply

Harvard study abroad programs are selective. To apply, students must:

  • Be at least 18 years old
  • Have completed at least one year of college or be a first-year student
  • Be in good academic standing

All programs are limited enrollment.

How to apply

For all programs, application requires a completed online application, including a statement of interest in the program, a nonrefundable $50 application fee, and a transcript. Some programs may require additional application materials and interviews.

English Language Requirements

English is the language of instruction at Harvard Summer School. If your native language is not English, you must provide proof of English proficiency, unless you are an admitted degree candidate in Harvard College, the Harvard Extension School, or a Harvard graduate or professional school.

Visa Requirements

The F-1 student visa is the appropriate visa for you if your main reason for coming to the United States is to attend a Harvard Summer School session on campus.

To be issued the F-1 student visa, you must first obtain the I-20 Certificate of Eligibility from Harvard Summer School.

Tuition Fee Per Full Programme

  • USD 3050 International
  • USD 3050 National
Tuition fee:
  • 3050 USD 4 credit course
  • 6100 USD 8 credit course

Funding

Check the programme website for information about funding options.

StudyPortals Tip: Students can search online for independent or external scholarships that can help fund their studies. Check the scholarships to see whether you are eligible to apply. Many scholarships are either merit-based or needs-based.

Testimonial Registration Module

The Global Study Awards: get funded with up to £10,000 to study abroad

Together with the ISIC Association and British Council IELTS, StudyPortals offers you the chance to receive up to £10000 to expand your horizon and study abroad. We want to ultimately encourage you to study abroad in order to experience and explore new countries, cultures and languages.